Interview: Yawatta Hosby

yawatta

I am pleased to present an interview with Yawatta Hosby, who writes because it’s all about the mind games…

Describe yourself in 5 words:

YH: Quirky, INTJ, Laidback, Creative, Mysterious.

Share a short excerpt and blurb of your latest book:

EXCERPT: “Where do you think they are?” Logan asked.

Kenan sat on top of a rotted tree stump. He rubbed his forehead. “I have no idea. If I did, we’d already be there.”

Logan sighed. He had no choice but to follow Kenan’s lead because he knew the area more than Logan did.

He wanted to ask Kenan a more personal question, like did he think something awful happened to them? Kenan was quiet during their search and had calmly taken over this morning that Logan couldn’t tell if his friend was freaking out.

If a tragedy happened ten years ago, it could occur again.

BLURB: Alone in the woods, the weekend turns into a deadly game when a killer hunts Rae and her friends. They struggle to stay alive and discover the truth. Is someone stalking them, or is there a killer among the group?

Share an excerpt of your favorite author’s work (10-100 words):

YH: I’m sharing Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None. My novel was inspired by this book:

What was the name? The signature was rather difficult to read. Emily Brent thought patiently: “So many people write their signatures quite illegibly.”

She let her mind run back over the people at Belhaven. She had been there two summers running.

What do you enjoy about the genre in which you write?:

YH: It’s all about the mind games for me. Who’s mentally stronger to win in the end? The fear is entertaining as well. I love creating situations that have readers afraid. That have them jump out of their seat or force them to sleep with the light on.

I love creating the bad guys and the good guys. And the twists and turns will always be my favorite part of a book. I want readers to think they know the outcome, only to be surprised by the ending. My biggest fear—being boring.

What is your definition of “good writing”?

YH: Good writing focuses on description in a scene. Readers should be able to vividly see, hear, taste, and feel everything as though they’re taking the journey with your characters, not just reading about them.

Good writing consists of understanding the genre you write for and applying the formula. Don’t mislead readers and tell them it’s a horror story when it’s really a paranormal love story. Don’t tell them it’s a contemporary drama when it keeps them laughing instead of crying.

Please share your #1 tip for writers in the mystery/suspense/thriller genre:

YH: Stephen King says it best: “Don’t write in fear.” Don’t be afraid to make your story go there. Don’t be afraid of controversy or edgy topics. I think readers will respect you for it. Write the story that speaks to you, not the one you’re unmotivated to write but think it’ll be a bestseller. If you’re not really feeling the story, the readers will be able to tell.

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With a desire to escape every day life, YAWATTA HOSBY creates stories. She’s always had a fascination with psychology, so she likes to focus on the inner-struggles within her characters. Her short story “Room For Two” is published in the online literary magazine The Write Place At the Write Time (Spring/Summer 2013 edition).

Yawatta Hosby Online: Website | Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Amazon | Goodreads | Guest Post

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Acknowledgments (Wilde Twins)

thankyou

This is the text from the acknowledgments page of my Wilde Twins psychological thriller series.

Direct links (where applicable) are included below :)

— Jess C Scott / jessINK

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am indebted to the following people for their help and support:

To friends and family, thanks for putting up with my shenanigans over the years.
To fans/readers: YOU ROCK!
To ID Channel, thank you for the resources.
To Stephen King, thank you for Carrie (and everything else).
To Lisa Lip at The Arts House, thank you for organizing the events.

To Marina / Darkstar, SS, GN, CR, SB, DM, DW, PJ, NR, GK, GV, GM, JS, RS, BM, AZ, LY (and many more)—thank you for the emails/stories and reminding me to keep it real.

To fellow authors, Joseph Grinton, Matt Posner, Joe Perrone Jr., Katherine Mayfield, Charles Austin Muir, K.C. Finn, Jeffrey Kosh, Clayton Bye, Morgen Bailey, Lae Monier, Marie-Jo Fortis, Kristopher Miller, Maria Savva, Darcia Helle, Mike Fook, Peejay Bayliss, Andrew Penney, Cliff Burns, Edward Giles Brown—a big thank you for your time/input, support, and the original work you do.

To Julie Ann Dawson, thank you for your work and Bards and Sages Quarterly.

To Mystery Man, thank you for being a constant inspiration to dream more, learn more, do more and become more.